Treating drug dependence with the aid of ibogaine:

These results suggest that the use of ibogaine supervised by a physician and accompanied by psychotherapy can facilitate prolonged periods of abstinence, without the occurrence of fatalities or complications. These results suggest that ibogaine can be a safe and effective treatment for dependence on stimulant and other non-opiate drugs.

Internet-purchased ibogaine toxicity confirmed with serum, urine, and product content levels

Charles W O'connell, Roy R Gerona, Matthew W Friesen, Binh T Ly

The American journal of emergency medicine 33 (7), 985. e5-985. e6, 2015

Ibogaine, a psychotropic indole alkaloid, is gaining popularity among medical subcultures for its purported antiaddictive properties. Its use has been associated with altered mental status, ataxia, gastrointestinal distress, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden and unexplained deaths. Its pharmacokinetics in toxic states is not well understood. Case report: A 33-year-old man overdosed on ibogaine in an attempt to quit his use of heroin. He developed altered state of consciousness, tremor, ataxia, nausea, vomiting, and transient QT interval prolongation …

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Treating drug dependence with the aid of ibogaine: A retrospective study

Eduardo Ekman Schenberg, Maria Angélica de Castro Comis, Bruno Rasmussen Chaves, Dartiu Xavier da Silveira

Journal of Psychopharmacology 28 (11), 993-1000, 2014

Ibogaine is an alkaloid purported to be an effective drug dependence treatment. However, its efficacy has been hard to evaluate, partly because it is illegal in some countries. In such places, treatments are conducted in underground settings where fatalities have occurred. In Brazil ibogaine is unregulated and a combined approach of psychotherapy and ibogaine is being practiced to treat addiction. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ibogaine, we conducted a retrospective analysis of data from 75 previous alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and crack users (72% poly-drug users). We observed no serious adverse reactions or fatalities, and found 61% of participants abstinent. Participants treated with ibogaine only once reported abstinence for a median of 5.5 months and those treated multiple times for a median of 8.4 months. This increase was statistically significant (p < 0.001), and both single or multiple treatments led to longer abstinence periods than before the first ibogaine session (p < 0.001). These results suggest that the use of ibogaine supervised by a physician and accompanied by psychotherapy can facilitate prolonged periods of abstinence, without the occurrence of fatalities or complications. These results suggest that ibogaine can be a safe and effective treatment for dependence on stimulant and other non-opiate drugs.